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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. About the Fraternity
  2. About Delta Theta Sigma
  3. Parent Questions

About the Fraternity:

What is a Fraternity? A Fraternity is a group of men bound together by friendship, brotherhood, and common goals. Being in a fraternity gives its members a network in which they can share their friendships, efforts, and knowledge. Together these members learn and grow, strengthening the fraternity, forming a brotherhood amongst the members, and developing strong and creative leadership, which leads to real-life success.  The experiences shared by the members builds ties that last a lifetime. 

Though there are many different Fraternities, they all share common founding principles that are of interest to any college man. Fraternities strive to enhance the educational experience by emphasizing intellectual, interpersonal, and social development. The ideals of lifelong friendship, sound education, campus and community service, and social interaction are what Fraternity men strive to live by every day. 

Don't Fraternities take up a lot of time? Fraternity membership requires anywhere from 2 to 8 hours a week. Meetings are held weekly on Monday nights, during which crucial business, ideas, and concerns are shared amongst the members.  Other events, such as party planning, community service projects, and social exchanges with the other houses on campus are also actively participated in by the members of the house.  However, although building strong friendships and social networks is an important part of the college experience, fraternity members have learned to manage their time wisely with other commitments like homework, relationships, family, and jobs. This is why many Fraternity members tend to succeed in their lives. 

If I'm new on campus, shouldn't I wait to get my "feet on the ground" before I join?  The University of Minnesota is a big place. As you get to know more people, you will feel more comfortable on campus. By joining in your first year, you will find adjusting to University life a lot easier.  Members of the fraternity are always around for support and guidance, as we all have been through the very same experiences ourselves. 

What is Rush? Fraternity Rush is a time when the Fraternities seek and recruit new men to join. It is a time when men on campus have an opportunity to visit each Fraternity and compare what each has to offer so that they may chose the one that fits them best. Rush does not cost you anything. All the Rush parties and functions are free! 

If I go through Rush, do I have to join a Fraternity?  No. Rush is a time to see what Fraternity life can offer you. Going to Rush events does not commit you to joining any one fraternity.

About Delta Theta Sigma:

Who is in charge of making sure I am well fed? Delta Theta Sigma is a unique fraternity in the fact that it has a number of “Little Sisters”-honorary female members of the fraternity.  Many of these Little Sisters, as well as many men in the house, are very proficient at cooking and preparing meals.  

Meals are prepared every day at noon and at 6 o’clock in the evening.  The Steward officer is in charge of planning the meals and stocking the groceries necessary for the week.  Meal plans are available for anybody living in the house, members or boarders alike.  These plans are fully customizable to allow easy adjustment around night classes or other activities.  A flat kitchen fee is charged as well, to allow access to everybody to milk, bread, cereal and juice that is always available. 

How does the house stay clean?  Responsibility is an essential skill to learn, especially during the college years.  Everybody in the house, members and boarders alike, are assigned specific house responsibilities to ensure that the house is maintained in a clean and orderly state.  The upkeep of these responsibilities is enforced by the House Manager office. 

Why is Delta Theta Sigma not a member of the IFC [InterFraternity Council]?  Delta Theta Sigma was once part of the IFC, but chose to discontinue its membership due to the fact that that continued participation would force us to lose some of the fundamental values that give our fraternity its individuality.  Nevertheless, we are continually active with all of the houses on the St. Paul campus that share similar backgrounds and ideals with the members of our house; Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity, Beta of Clovia sorority, Lambda Delta Phi sorority, and Farmhouse fraternity.

Parent Questions

Tell me about joining a fraternity and living in the fraternity house.Whenever you decide to become a new member, you are joining a group of men or women that share common goals and experiences. You will have the option of living in the house as early as your freshmen year.  The cost of living in the fraternity is 60-80% of the average cost of living in a residential hall. This cost includes room, board, and a flexible meal plan. We also have ample parking available for a minimal fee. The house has a variety of options available to everybody living in the house, including a quiet study room, a computer lab, a large dining room, a commons in the basement, a TV room (with cable), a private phone booth, four bathrooms, a laundry room, and even large freezer for personal food storage. 

I hear a lot about fraternities and alcohol. What is it really like in the fraternity?  Alcohol abuse is unhealthy and inconsistent with our ideals. All fraternities and sororities are expected to uphold state, county, and city laws, and university policies regarding the consumption of alcohol. While opportunities for all college students to choose wisely and poorly exists, Delta Theta Sigma provides a supportive and educational environment that ensures that if a member chooses to consume alcohol, to do so in a responsible manner. In addition, many of our members do not drink, and know that it is okay and feel comfortable with their decision.   

I'm concerned about my child's grades--what impact would fraternity membership have? Students often find managing their time difficult when moving from the highly structured high school environment to the freedoms of college. 
New students can access the network of fraternity members who already know how to use campus resources like the library, study skills centers, computer labs, and academic advisors. While fraternities are concerned about the academic achievement of their members, your son is still ultimately responsible for utilizing the resources made available. 

What about pledging or hazing?  New members of all houses experience a period of orientation. During this time, your son and the other new members will participate in weekly meetings to learn about the university and the fraternity, as well as community service projects and activities designed to build friendships among the new members and the older fraternity members. All fraternities & sororities oppose hazing and are committed to a membership education period which instills a sense of responsibility and commitment in the new members. This period will assist your son in overcoming some of his concerns about success in college. The University of Minnesota’s anti-hazing policy can be found at:http://www.fpd.finop.umn.edu/groups/ppd/documents/policy/hazing_pol.cfm

I am afraid that joining a fraternity will take up a lot of time. What about my time?  Participating in the fraternity can be time consuming. However, we encourage the learning of time management skills, both as a new member and an active member, which will help with involvement in the fraternity, on campus, and eventually in a professional career. 

Delta Theta Sigma offers a variety of involvement opportunities, including intramural sports, community service, and assuming leadership positions. Each member will find a level of commitment that is comfortable for him. By learning to balance academics, fraternal involvement, campus involvement, and social commitments, each member is more likely to be successful later on in professional life.

Doesn't it cost a lot of money to be in a fraternity house? Each fraternity is self-supported through dues charged to all members. In the first year of membership, a few one-time expenses are assessed. After those initial payments are made, the only expenses will be his regular dues, along with any other options, such as clothing.  Lodging and meals are competitive with other housing options. A variety of payment plans are offered as well.  

What is my role as a parent?  Be supportive and learn as much as you can by asking questions of your child as they meet people through the recruitment process. Fellow members will be more than happy to tell them (and you) about our organization. 

Because your endorsement of their choice means a lot to them, we encourage parents to ask questions and become as informed as possible about fraternity life. If parents have any questions, they are encouraged to call or e-mail us.  Our telephone number is (612) 645-8787, and our current President can be e-mailed at duffx061@umn.edu.